CRM 2013: Dude, Where’s My Radio Button?!

Seriously. Where have the radio buttons gone for “Two Options” type bit fields in CRM 2013?!

Display Options for Bit fields in CRM 2013

In CRM 2011, if you have an entity that has an attribute of type “Two Options” bit field, you can choose to display this on the entity form as either:

  1. Radio Button, or
  2. Checkbox, or
  3. List.

A typical example is e.g. “Do not allow Email” bit field for the “Contact” entity. Under the hood if you look at the solution, the field is of type “Two Options”, with customisable labels for “0” and “1” optionset values. In my case, “0” is “Allowed” and “1” is “Do Not Allow”.

radiobuttons-01

On the Contact entity form, the control for this field can be customised to appear as one of the following:

radiobuttons-02

As a radio button, the “Email” field in CRM 2011 appears on the contact form like so:

radiobuttons-03

As a “Check box” or a “List”, the “Email” field in CRM 2011 appear as:

radiobuttons-04

radiobuttons-05

Dude, Where are the Radio Buttons in CRM 2013?!

Curiously, when I tried the same control formatting in CRM 2013 (current version I’m testing is 6.0.0.809), radio buttons are not rendered as radio buttons anymore even though the same 3 options are presented to you.

radiobuttons-06

However, the radio buttons control now renders on an entity form in CRM 2013 as a control that looks like a dropdown list, but clicking on the control will flip to the second option set value instead of displaying a list of 2 option set values:

radiobuttons-07

radiobuttons-08

Check box and list control format in CRM 2013 still look the same as in CRM 2011 though.

So, Microsoft Support Forum says…

It’s by design!

Yeah. Radio buttons are no more. See this question I asked earlier on: https://community.dynamics.com/crm/f/117/t/117339.aspx

Why why why?? I have no idea. But looks like we might have to say good bye to radio buttons as well in CRM 2013.

Oh well …

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “CRM 2013: Dude, Where’s My Radio Button?!

  1. I find this quite useful in Business Process Flows. You can mimic a ‘button’ by having some onChange code on the item. This makes the text of the control behave like a link that can be clicked to take an action.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s